Feature stories

This is a list of official ILO feature stories issued by the ILO office in Jakarta and Timor-Leste. Some are available in multiple languages, indicated on the top of each stories. The most recent stories is at the top.

2011

  1. The story of Umi Saodah: Tortured and trapped in war-torn Palestine

    15 September 2011

    “I’m still angry and cannot forget what they have done to me,” Umi Saodah, a 34-year-old, recalled. It’s still crystal clear in her mind how four family members of her employer tortured her two years ago. “They showed no mercy. If they were living here in Indonesia, I would retaliate,” she said.

  2. The story of Halimah: A father’s persisting regrets

    15 September 2011

    Kohar, 49 years old and a resident of Cianjur, West Java, has five children: four daughters and a son. His wife died in 1999 and his two eldest daughters have worked in Saudi Arabia. When his third daughter, Halimah, 27 years of age, asked his permission to follow in her sisters’ footsteps working in Saudi Arabia as a migrant domestic worker, he could not say no.

  3. The story of Elli Anita: Resilience in the face of adversity

    15 September 2011

    Elli Anita is the third daughter of a family who joined the government-sponsored resettlement program from Jember in East Java to Bandar Lampung, Sumatra, when she was 18 years old. She holds an elementary school level leaving certificate and was expected to work on the family farm. However, after listening to the stories of fellow villagers, she was keen to work overseas as a domestic worker and see other countries.

  4. The story of Siti Tarwiyah: Beaten to death in Saudi Arabia; blood money is all that remains of a mother’s love

    15 September 2011

    “I’m still so traumatized. I can not forget my late wife. Her body was covered in wounds as a result of regular caning,” recalled Hamid, the husband of Siti Tarwiyah who died in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, three years ago. Her body was bruised everywhere because members of the employers family used to smash her up against walls. She was only 32 years old when she died.

  5. The story of Ceriyati: Escaping abuse in Malaysia

    15 September 2011

    Ceriyati Binti Dapin, a 37-year-old mother of a handicapped son, had no other choice but to become a migrant domestic worker in order to supplement the income of her husband Ridwan, who worked as an ojek driver in the Central Java town of Brebes. Despite the long recruitment process and delays in getting employment in Malaysia, she had a strong desire to help her husband cover her son’s regular medical costs.

  6. The story of Cassina: Trapped in war-torn Iraq

    15 September 2011

    Like most of her peers in Subang, West Java, Cassina had a strong desire to lift her family out of poverty as it had a debilitating effect on them since her marriage in 1996. Her husband’s daily income as an ojek driver was inadequate to cover their daily needs and pay for their ten year-old son’s monthly school tuition fees. Having heard the success stories about her fellow villagers working in Malaysia and Middle East, she decided she wanted to work in Abu Dhabi.

  7. Public-private partnerships in Asia Pacific – the best of two systems

    26 August 2011

    Public-private partnerships are gaining increasing traction in international development cooperation and are being used more and more by the International Labour Organization (ILO). By Wolfgang Schiefer, Chief, Regional Partnerships, Resource Mobilization and UN Reform, ILO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific

  8. Young Timorese beautician is a cut above the rest

    29 July 2011

    Eugenia de Jesus Cardoso now runs a successful beauty salon in her hometown, in Maliana, her hometown in Timore-Leste. She gained the business and specialist skills she needed during a training programme run by the Timore-Leste Government and the ILO’s Youth Employment Promotion (YEP) programme. By Matt Crook for the ILO Liaison Office for Timor-Leste

  9. From zero to hero – a story of Yayuk

    15 May 2011

    Not many expected, at first, that Endang Sri Wahyuni, 43 years old, from PPSW Pasoendan, a NGO dealing with women’s empowerment, would be nominated as one of the best trainers of the ILO’s Start and Improve Your Business (SIYB). Although remaining friendly and humble, Yayuk, as she is usually called, is now talkative, expressive and communicative. Different from the silent Yayuk, who did not even say a word during the first training she attended in 2007.

  10. Breaking the glass ceiling: The story of two Nias women as the supervisor sites in the construction sector

    15 May 2011

    It never crossed the minds of these two young women of Nias Island, Kiki and Lisna, that they could work as site supervisors in road construction works as construction workers have traditionally been though of as “male territory”. But thanks to the opportunities given by the ILO’s Nias Rural Access and Capacity Building Project, these two women have been trained and now are working as site supervisors. This initiative has opened the career opportunities in the construction sector for young women on Nias.