Papers and Briefs

  1. What drives CSR? An empirical analysis on the labour dimensions of CSR

    05 August 2020

    Relying on the data provided by an ESG rating agency, this paper aims at bringing more understanding on the diversity of firms’ behaviours in terms of labour related CSR and filling a gap on the potential role of labour market institutions, including workers’ collective rights, to contribute to an effective CSR policy.

  2. COVID-19 and global supply chains: How the jobs crisis propagates across borders

    29 June 2020

    This brief investigates the international propagation through global supply chains of the demand and supply disruptions caused by the COVID-19 crisis. It provides estimates of the number of jobs in manufacturing supply chains that are at risk as a result of those disruptions.

  3. Delivering income and employment support in times of COVID-19: Integrating cash transfers with active labour market policies

    18 June 2020

    This brief examines how income support and active labour market policies can come together to improve workers' prospects in times of COVID-19, particularly in emerging and developing countries. It identifies the characteristics that determined the success of such polices in the past, and discusses how they can be adapted to today’s pandemic to contribute to rebuilding employment opportunities.

  4. Digital manufacturing revolutions as political projects and hypes: evidences from the auto sector

    27 April 2020

    The article analyses the evolution of automotive manufacturing technologies and organisations and assesses the impact of “fourth industrial revolution” concepts and policies (in Germany, US and Chi­na) in particular for employment and work.

  5. Environmental integrity and doing business in Zimbabwe: Challenges and engagement of sustainable enterprises

    01 April 2020

    The objective of this paper is to explore the views of different groups of the business community, including workers, managers and owners of the formal as well as of the informal economy, on how environmental integrity is being pursued in Zimbabwe. Both quantitative and qualitative/interpretative methods have been applied. The paper concludes suggesting actions that the private sector can adopt to improve the existing situation and further strengthen its engagement towards environmental integrity in the country.

  6. Gender inequality and old-age income security: The case of Mexico

    21 January 2020

  7. Economic and social upgrading in the Philippines’ pineapple supply chain

    19 October 2019

    Despite several decades of steady growth, Mindanao’s tropical agro-food industry and the pineapple supply chain more specifically are characterized by a relatively large proportion of workers being linked to small-scale production and low-skilled, labour-intensive and poorly paid work. What is the evidence regarding the alignment between economic improvement of the local industry and the quality and terms of employment realized by its workers?

  8. Employment programs and conflict in Somalia

    17 October 2019

    The notion that employment can contribute to peace is the explicit backdrop to a large number of employment programmes in conflict-affected states. However, there is lack of knowledge on the links between employment programmes and peace and on which programme designs maximise impact. This research investigates the role played by employment programs in reducing willingness of people to engage in violence in Somalia.

  9. Eligibility and participation in unemployment benefit schemes: Evidence from Mauritius

    17 October 2019

    The article explores the determinants of participation in the unemployment benefit system in Mauritius, focusing on the role played by eligibility criteria and take-up

  10. Combating Extreme Poverty by Providing Active Support as Part of a Conditional Cash Transfer Schemes

    16 October 2019

    Integrating active labour market policies (ALMPs) into poverty alleviation programmes can foster employment opportunities while protecting individuals’ incomes from the consequences of a severe recession. Recent research on Uruguay’s response to the economic crisis of 2002 demonstrates that allowing the beneficiaries of cash transfer schemes to voluntary participate in public works increases their chances of finding jobs afterwards, and at the same time counteracts any indirect negative effect that income support may have on labour market outcomes.