Summit of G20 Labour and Employment Ministers, Ankara

ILO welcomes G20 priority of boosting growth, jobs and reducing inequalities

The ILO Director-General highlighted ministers’ agreement to undertake a mix of policies using “wage-setting mechanisms, institutions for social dialogue, social protection systems, employment services and active labour market policies.”

Comunicado de prensa | 4 de septiembre de 2015
ANKARA – “G20 labour and employment ministers’ strong commitment to tackling inequalities as well as creating better jobs, more inclusive societies and stronger economic growth is significant and timely,” said International Labour Organization (ILO) Director-General Guy Ryder at the close of the G20 meeting in Ankara.

Ministers identified the long-term trend of rising inequalities in many G20 economies as having a negative impact on current and potential growth and being inconsistent with G20 leaders’ goal of strong, sustainable and balanced growth. They also recognized that this trend has often been associated with slow wage growth when compared to productivity gains and a decline or stagnation in the labour income share in some of the G20 countries.

G20 labour and employment ministers adopted a communiqué Creating quality jobs for all, investing in skills and reducing inequalities to promote inclusive and robust growth.

The ILO Director-General highlighted ministers’ agreement to undertake a mix of policies using “wage-setting mechanisms, institutions for social dialogue, social protection systems, employment services and active labour market policies.”

In a further significant move, ministers recommended that G20 leaders “consider the adoption of a G20 target on reducing the share of young people who are most at risk of being left permanently behind in the labour market by 15 per cent by 2025.”

“This very specific G20 target addresses worldwide concern that the aspirations of the current generation of young women and men for a decent job are being frustrated, with enormous damage to our societies,” said Ryder.

G20 ministers also discussed policies to increase employment and the quality of jobs. The ILO Director-General welcomed the consensus in the G20 to respect fundamental principles and rights at work, as well as to improve job quality along three dimensions, namely promoting the quality of earnings, reducing labour market insecurity, and promoting good working conditions and healthy workplaces.

The Turkish Presidency invited international organizations of employers and trade unions (the Business 20 and Labour 20), along with several civil society outreach groups, to a social dialogue session with G20 ministers. As well as their own separate statements, the B20 and L20 presented a comprehensive set of joint recommendations to ministers.

“I am sure the fact that business and labour were able to present an impressive set of agreed policy priorities to ministers greatly helped governments to also find a constructive consensus for action at a very challenging time,” said Ryder.

Mr Ryder participated in the two-day ministerial meeting and a joint session with finance ministers. The ILO, together with other international organizations, presented a series of background reports to ministers warning of the risks posed by weakening growth and widening inequality.

Referring to one of the joint reports entitled The Contribution of labour mobility to economic growth Ryder said: “the dramatic events taking place not far from here and the resulting movement of people in circumstances we all know will have unavoidable labour market repercussions and, sooner or later, we will have to address these. This is not a national but a joint international problem.

“The fact that the G20 has decided to examine this issue is to be applauded, in addition to its discussions on how better and fairer management of labour migration can yield stronger growth both for counties of origin and destination.”