News and statements on labour migration

  1. ILO signs US$1,140,000 partnership with Korean Government

    27 June 2012

    The ILO and the Government of the Republic of Korea have signed an agreement that will provide US$1,140,000, as well as technical expertise, to support the development of decent work in more than 15 Asian countries.

  2. Boosting the signal: Helping migrant workers from Myanmar in Thailand

    25 June 2012

    More than 80 per cent of migrant workers in Thailand are from Myanmar. A community radio has caught their ear helping them to understand Thailand’s immigration laws and advocating for their rights at work. Allan Dow reports.

  3. Protecting the health rights of Indonesian migrant workers against gender based violence and HIV and AIDS vulnerabilities

    27 March 2012

    Although the Government of Indonesia has issued a number of regulations concerning migrant workers and gender mainstreaming, significant challenges still hamper the development of effective policy and regulations for the protection of migrant workers against gender based violence and HIV and AIDS. Indonesian women migrant workers, a majority of whom work as domestic workers, are particularly vulnerable to gender based violence and to HIV and AIDS throughout the entire course of the migratory cycle.

  4. Examining conditions of domestic workers and child domestic workers in Nusa Tenggara Timur

    26 March 2012

    Despite of the importance of the role of domestic workers, domestic work is still not recognized as work. Since their work is done in private households, which are not considered work places in many countries, their employment relationship is not addressed in national labour laws or other legislation, denying them recognition as workers entitled to labour protection.

  5. Examining conditions of domestic workers and child domestic workers in North Sumatra

    21 March 2012

    The great majority of domestic workers are female with low educational levels; they mainly come from poor families in rural communities. Apart from adult domestic workers, one of the most common child labour forms found in Indonesia is child domestic labour.

  6. Providing better economic protection to Indonesian migrant workers

    19 March 2012

    Indonesian migrant workers and their families need to have a good understanding about the financial implications of migration, including the earnings, costs and deductions inherent in placement and employment overseas, as well as hazards and conditions. Financial education plays an important role in enabling Indonesian migrant workers and their families to administer, save and invest the earnings which migrant workers remit to their families on a regular basis throughout their employment overseas.

  7. Examining conditions of domestic workers and child domestic workers in South Sulawesi

    19 March 2012

    To address issues related to domestic workers and child domestic workers and as an effort to provide recognition to domestic workers, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and SmartFM Makassar, a leading radio station in Makassar, will organize an interactive talkshow, “Problems and Solutions on Domestic Workers and Child Domestic Workers in South Sulawesi” on Monday, 19 March 2012, at Krakatau Ballroom, Horison Hotel, Makassar, South Sulawesi.

  8. Examining conditions of domestic workers and child domestic workers in West Java

    15 March 2012

    According to an ILO study in 2004, there were an estimated 2,593,399 domestic workers in Indonesia; of these, 1.4 million domestic workers were estimated to work in Java alone. The great majority of domestic workers are female with low educational levels; they mainly come from poor families in rural communities in Indonesia.

  9. Examining ratification of international migrant workers instruments

    13 March 2012

    As the second largest sending country, some 700,000 documented Indonesian migrant workers leave the country for work abroad, primarily in East and South East Asia as well as the Middle East. Of these, 78 per cent work as domestic workers. In 2009, around 4.3 million Indonesians were estimated to be working abroad.

  10. Examining conditions of domestic workers and child domestic workers in East Java

    07 March 2012

    Domestic workers also represent the single largest group of female salaried workers toiling away in households of others in their own country or abroad. Despite of the importance of the role of domestic workers, domestic work is still not recognized as work.