Tools and Services

This section is based on a typology compilation of ILO publications, tools and services prepared by the Policy Department. It is reorganised to match the 24 thematic areas and provides appropriate ILO research papers, instructional material, publications, project documentation, ILO-ITC online courses, toolkits, etc.

2006

  1. Publication

    Know more about HIV/AIDS - A Toolkit for Workers in the Informal Economy

    01 January 2006

    The Toolkit is based on the ILO Code of Practice on HIV/AIDS and the World of Work which sets out fundamental principles for policy development and practical guidelines for action in the following key areas: Prevention of HIV and AIDS; Management and mitigation of the impact of HIV and AIDS on the world of work; Care and support of workers infected and affected by HIV and AIDS; and Elimination of stigma and discrimination on the basis of HIV status.

2005

  1. Publication

    Informal Economy, Undeclared Work and Labour Administration

    14 June 2005

    In line with the ILO resolution concerning decent work and the informal economy, adopted at the International Labour Conference in 2002, governments have a key role to play, in consultation with workers and employers, in promoting decent work through the extension of their services to the informal economy. This requires the development of innovative approaches and new tools which can be used by ministries of labour to promote decent work through technical assistance to small and micro-enterprises and independent or self-employed workers. During the current biennium, José Luis Daza, Senior Labour Administration Specialist of the Dialogue Department, worked on this research paper for ministries of labour on the theme “informal economy, undeclared work and labour administration”.

  2. Publication

    Best practices in HIV/AIDS prevention, in the informal sector

    11 March 2005

    This paper is based on experiences from the ILO’s four-country study on HIV/AIDS mitigation in the informal sector. It considers “best practices” that have been identified in workplace policies and programmes on HIV/AIDS in the informal economy. It focuses especially on examples which might guide and inform practices and policies pertaining to the informal economy with regard to the following: information and awareness-raising programmes, training and behavioural change programmes, working conditions - including aspects such as travel, hygiene, childcare arrangements - counselling and testing, care and support possibilities. The paper gives an overview of good practices taken from the four countries in which the ILO informal economy research project was carried out. Quantitative and qualitative studies, including participatory rapid assessments, were carried out in Uganda, Ghana, Tanzania and South Africa. The studies were conducted (a) to gather necessary KAPB data from informal workers in the four countries and (b) to initiate participatory, community-based approaches with the aim of organising governments, local governments and local communities to implement a sustained response to the challenges of the HIV/AIDS epidemic within the informal economy.

  3. Publication

    Joint ILO/WHO guidelines on health services and HIV/AIDS

    01 January 2005

    The purpose of these guidelines is to promote the sound management of HIV/AIDS in health services, including the prevention of occupational exposure. Furthermore, the purpose is to ensure that health-care workers have decent, safe and healthy working conditions, while ensuring effective care that respects the needs and rights of patients, especially those living with HIV/AIDS. These guidelines rest on the basic principle that the process of policy development and implementation should be the result of consultation and collaboration between all concerned parties, based on social dialogue and including, to the extent possible, persons and workers living with HIV/AIDS. They take a rights-based approach to HIV/AIDS, as promoted by the Declaration of Commitment and the international community at large, expanding on ILO and WHO HIV/AIDS and occupational safety and health instruments.

  4. Instructional material

    Social dialogue in the health services: A tool for practical guidance – The handbook for practitioners

    01 January 2005

2004

  1. Quantitative Methods in Social Protection Series

    Actuarial practice in social security

    01 January 2004

    Presents technical material on valuation covering a wide-range of risks including old age, survivors, disability, sickness, maternity, employment injury, and unemployment. Provides concrete examples of work done by actuaries. It discusses the valuation of pensions, short-term cash benefits like sickness, maternity and unemployment insurance and examines the valuation of employment injury benefits as well. In addition, the book devotes special attention to what should be included in the actuarial report and presents a practical exercise to illustrate the important points discussed in the volume.

2003

  1. Normative instrument

    Guidelines concerning a statistical definition of informal employment

    01 November 2003

  2. Instructional material

    Integrated Rural Accessibility Planning (IRAP) Modular Training Package

    01 January 2003

2002

  1. Instructional material

    Combating child labour: A handbook for labour inspectors

    01 January 2002

    This handbook will be a most useful instrument for labour inspectors in that it provides an overview of what their role can be with respect to child labour, and shows how to focus in on the problem, not only in the urban factory or establishment, but the informal sector workshops, rural communities and fields as well.

  2. Publication

    Standards for the XXIst Century: Social Security

    01 January 2002

    Describes the characteristics of the ILO’s social security standards, highlighting their universality and flexibility and their common principles. Examines the protection afforded in each of the nine branches of social security and considers the treatment of migrant workers.